Impacted wisdom teeth are difficult to extract after the ages of late teens or early twenties, the healing time is much longer. Learn about its diagnosis which will help to determine whether you have some problems to solve.

Impacted Wisdom Teeth Diagnosis

Impacted Wisdom Teeth Diagnosis

impcted_wisdom_teeth_diagnosisWisdom teeth, also called the third morals, are the chewing teeth found furthest in the back of the mouth. If there is necessary room for them and they are aligned properly, wisdom teeth come in behind the 2nd molars, as a rule throughout a person's late teens or early twenties.

The impacted wisdom teeth often partly come in at the later ages (45-55). At that time they are not only difficult to extract, but the healing time is much longer.

In order to describe the positioning of impacted wisdom teeth, dentists used two terms. There are two methods of describing the "impaction" of the wisdom teeth. The most common way is to describe the direction of the impaction. For instance, mesial impaction (also known as angular impaction) means that the wisdom tooth is angled forward, on the way to the front of the mouth. In distal impaction the wisdom tooth is angled toward the throat. While vertical impaction the tooth is angled toward the head and, finally, the horizontal impaction means the tooth is directed to one side (left or right).

Also the impacted teeth can be depicted according to the degree of impaction. If the tooth is just hided beneath the gum, it is called soft-tissue impaction. In case when the tooth is covered by the gum and to some extent of the jaw bone, it is called partial-bony impaction. And if the tooth is covered under the gum and all the jaw bone, it is known as complete-bony impaction.

Instead of removing wisdom teeth you can keep them. A small number of lucky people are able to keep their wisdom teeth and care for them as they would their other teeth. People with large jaws, like blacks and African, can often restrain their wisdom teeth because their wisdom teeth have space to grow properly in the mouth. But for most of us, this isn't possible, and a delay in their removal can result in serious complications.

The proper time for the surgical removal of the wisdom teeth is when they are about 2/3 of the completely developed sizes. This is usually at the ages of late teens or early twenties. At present, there are two common practices for surgical removal of the wisdom teeth. The most common advice is to remove all four under intravenous sedation and local anesthesia. Or else you can unilaterally extract one side (upper and lower wisdom teeth), two at a time, 3-6 month apart, under local anesthesia.